William Shakespeare’s Love Sonnets

love

If I should think of love, I’d think of you.
If I should think of love
I’d think of you, your arms uplifted,
Tying your hair in plaits above,

The lyre shape of your arms and shoulders,
The soft curve of your winding head.
No melody is sweeter, nor could Orpheus
So have bewitched. I think of this,

And all my universe becomes perfection.
But were you in my arms, dear love,
The happiness would take my breath away,

No thought could match that ecstasy,
No song encompass it, no other worlds.
If I should think of love,
I’d think of you.

Sonnet 116

Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O no, it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wand’ring bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.

Sonnet 130

My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun;
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red;
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun;
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damask’d, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks;
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound;
I grant I never saw a goddess go;
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground:
And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare.

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About Author Annette J Dunlea Irish Writer

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